Basic Food Safety Tips Everyone Should Know

Foods, including safely cooked, ready-to-eat foods, can become cross-contaminated with bacteria transferred from raw products, meat juices or other contaminated products, or from food handlers with poor personal hygiene.Botulism, a life-threatening illness caused by the bacteria Clostridium outline, were reported in the United States. Frozen, fully cooked products were suspected of causing these illnesses. The Food Safety and Inspection Service food packaging company advises all consumers to handle frozen, fully-cooked products in accordance with these food safety recommendations.

Remember to keep the cooler in a shady spot. Keep it covered with a blanket, tarp or poncho, preferably one that is light in color to reflect heat.Bring along bottled water or other canned or bottled drinks. Always assume that streams and rivers are not safe for drinking. If camping in a remote area, bring along water purification tablets or equipment.Do not let perishable food sit out while swimming or fishing. Remember, food sitting out for more than 2 hours is not safe. The time frame is reduced to just 1 hour if the outside temperature is above 90 °F.

If you are traveling with perishable food, place it in a cooler with ice or freezer packs. Have plenty of ice or frozen gel-packs on hand before starting to pack food. If you take meat, poultry, eggs, for eating on the road or to cook at your vacation spot, plan to keep everything on ice in your cooler.

Keep raw meat and poultry wrapped separately from cooked foods, or foods meant to be eaten raw such as fruits. Limit the times the cooler is opened. Open and close the lid quickly. Pack perishable foods directly from the refrigerator or freezer into the cooler. If the cooler is only partially filled, pack the remaining space with more ice. Limit the times the cooler is opened. Open and close the lid quickly.

If you do fishing and are lucky the big one did not get away, gut and clean the fish as soon as they are caught. Wrap both whole and cleaned fish in watertight plastic and store on ice. Keep 3-4 inches of ice on the bottom of the cooler. Alternate layers of fish and ice. After cooking, eat within 3-4 days. Make sure the raw fish stays separate from cooked foods.

Crabs, lobsters and other shellfish must be kept alive until cooked. Store in a bushel or laundry basket under wet burlap. Crabs and lobsters are best eaten the day they are caught. Live oysters can keep 7-10 days. Mussels and clams, 4-5 days.Caution: Be aware of the potential dangers of eating raw shellfish. This is especially true for persons with liver disorders or weakened immune systems. Warning, no one should eat raw shellfish.

If you go to the beach take along only the food that can be eaten to avoid having leftovers. If grilling, make sure local ordinances allow it. Bring the cooler! Partially bury it in the sand, cover with blankets, and shade with a beach umbrella.Thoroughly wash metal pans, ceramic dishes, and utensils (including can openers) with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse and then sanitize them by boiling in clean water or immersing them for 15 minutes in a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available

Thoroughly wash countertops with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse and then sanitize them by applying a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available). Allow air-drying.Bacteria may be present on products when you purchase them. Raw meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs are not sterile. Neither is fresh produce such as lettuce, tomatoes, sprouts, and melons.

 

 

 

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published.